WHEN THEY RING THOSE GOLDEN BELLS

Deep-Roots-Cover-CD-BabyWhen I decided to record a CD of hymns, the very first song I chose was “When They Ring Those Golden Bells.” I’ve never heard anyone sing it in any church I’ve ever attended, and when I ask people about it not that many people seem to know this song.

But all of my life, I’ve heard my dad singing it. It’s the song that’s always on his lips – which was, honestly, kind of traumatic as a teenager walking into the mall with my dad singing at the top of his lungs . . .

So I knew I had to record it for my Dad.

As I was selecting the hymns for Deep Roots, I found something really interesting. For the most part, these songs don’t shy away from heavier themes. Fear and doubt, hardship and loss – even death. But at the heart of the best hymns, there’s a fierce joy, a determination to persevere and remain faithful in the face of hardship.

And with “When They Ring Those Golden Bells,” there’s a certainty that our hope is not unfounded, and that our Father’s faithfulness is assured.

Listen to Scott reading this blog post (and the song) here:

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3 Responses to WHEN THEY RING THOSE GOLDEN BELLS

  1. Chelle says:

    Hey! That was fun to listen to! Are you going to perform and record all of your blogs from now on? Maybe you should do a podcast!

  2. John Kurtz says:

    I only know the Mahalia Jackson version of this hymn, so your version is really different. But I like it.

  3. Scott Riggan says:

    Hey guys, thanks for your comments.

    Chelle, that audio is from a special radio promotion that I did when the record first came out. I thought it might be fun to use here on the blog . . . So no, I don’t intend to do that for every blog – and I don’t have time to even consider doing a podcast! But thanks!!

    John, I just went looking for that Mahalia version – I’d never heard it! I’m mostly familiar with my dad’s a cappella version . . . 🙂 But I’ve also heard Emmy Lou Harris and Tennessee Ernie Ford’s versions. It’s usually a slow country ballad sung at funerals, I think.

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